Skip to main content

Bad Santa 2: Average Guy Movie Review


In 2003 Bad Santa was a surprise hit. It was crude, rude, hilarious and mildly festive making it a Christmas movie like no other. Conmen Willie (Billy Bob Thornton) and Marcus (Tony Cox) pose as Santa Clause and his little helper in a different shopping mall every year in order to rob the place on Christmas Eve. Now thirteen years later Marcus gets out of jail and approaches Willie about pulling off one last job. This time round Willie's mum Sunny (Kathy Bates) is in on the caper and his special friend Thurman Merman is along for the ride.


When movie companies wait over a decade to make a sequel you have to wonder why they bothered given that what they come up with isn't usually very good. Unfortunately the results here are no different. Bad Santa 2 isn't a bad movie, it's funny - in some cases just as funny as Bad Santa - but it doesn't bring anything new to the table. The formula is the same as the original, in fact it's basically the same movie without the magic that made the first so great. That being said, the opening 10-15 minutes were brilliant. But despite great performances from the main cast and some good laughs things start to go down hill, resulting in a third act that feels lazy and tacked on.


You have to wonder how thirteen years later Willie isn't dead from liver failure. And how desperate he has to be to work with the guy that tried to kill him. One thing they did get right with Bad Santa 2 is the relationship between Willie and Marcus, it's still just as funny to see them at each others throats. Kathy Bates fits in well as Sunny, at times you wonder who Willie hates more, Sunny or Marcus. It's Brett Kelly's return as Thurman Merman that I struggle with, which isn't a criticism of his performance because he nails the role. I just don't think his presence was necessary. Thirteen years ago Thurman was a dumb kid without any real adult influence in his life, now all of a sudden he's mentally handicapped, which he confirms by telling us he's on the spectrum. In Bad Santa, Thurman was a moral influence for Willie, now he's just the butt of many jokes - quick and easy comedy mixed with a touch of nostalgia. 


Overall Bad Santa 2 is an ok movie, you won't leave the cinema pissed off that you watched it. But you will wonder why they bothered making it in the first place. It's definitely not a movie we needed given that Bad Santa works so well as a stand alone movie. The good performances by the main cast and the occasional laugh out loud jokes aren't enough to save the movie from it's predictable 'comedy sequel by numbers' story. If you're struggling for something to watch you could definitely do worse, but given the choice I'd rather watch the original.

5/10


What did you think of Bad Santa 2? Let us know by leaving a comment below or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Snyder Cut | Wouldn't Be The First Time a Director Got a Second Chance

It seems that a fairly common occurrence amongst movies tied to Warner Bros. is the magical disappearing/reappearing director. Does that mean there's hope for the Snyder Cut? I certainly hope so!


Ever since Justice League hit cinemas in 2017 - possibly even before - fans have been calling for Zack Snyder's original vision to be released. Snyder famously faced issues regarding the darker tone and longer run times his movies were taking, especially after the negative response to 'Batman v Superman'. This of course led to rewrites of the superhero team-up movie, and certain plotlines established or teased in 'BvS' - including the epic Knightmare scene - being dropped. The director then left the production after the tragic death of his daughter. Joss Whedon was brought in by the studio to finish the movie, this included the completion of post production and some major reshoots, further altering the movie. All of which resulted in a movie that is drastically differen…

Moustache Lockdown Streaming Survival Guide Part 2 | Bosch

The lockdown continues this Easter weekend, and despite the absolutely glorious weather it's important that we stay at home. On that note, here's another TV show to keep you entertained; 'Bosch', available on Amazon Prime.

Check out part 1 of our streaming survival guide by clicking here.



Follow L.A.P.D. Homicide Detectives Harry Bosch (Titus Welliver) and Jerry Edgar (Jamie Hector) as they work to solve an endless stream of murders in the infamous Hollywood Division of Los Angeles. As well as a heavy caseload, the two must also navigate the perils of their personal lives, including marriage, divorce and parenthood. Their cases - some of which hit a little too close to home - often lead the two into trouble within the department and with the city's political hierarchy as well. But since when did that ever get in the way of the search for the truth? 



Based on the series of novels by Michael Connelly, each season beautifully recreates the books that inspired it, whilst …

Greyhound | Average Guy Movie Review

Greyhound is the lead ship in an escort group assigned to protect a convoy of merchant ships crossing the Atlantic in World War 2. Captain Ernie Krause (Tom Hanks), a career Navy man in his first command, must lead the fight against a wolfpack of German U-Boats. But will he be able to fight off the silent hunters long enough to get the convoy to the safety of British waters?

If ever there was a reason for you to sign up to Apple TV+, this is it. Much like Christopher Nolan said about Dunkirk, the movie Greyhound is more of an experience than a movie, which makes it a real shame that we didn't get to see it on the big screen, as it was intended. After a very brief introduction, the audience is thrown into the hell of life onboard a ship in the middle of the Atlantic in 1942. The whole story is told from the point of view of Captain Krause and his crew. Events are witnessed from the deck of the Greyhound and the occasional aerial shot, the German U-Boats are only glimpsed briefly as …